Posted on: June 18, 2020 Posted by: India Hires Comments: 0
HR Interview Questions

Have you ever had an HR interview before? I ‘m sure you could face one early enough in the event you haven’t. To help you prepare, we’ve curated this blog that covers some of the most frequently asked questions and answers from HR interviews.

The selection of jobs includes the following rounds, especially in India.

  1. A written review
  2. A group debate
  3. Private consultation with a committee
  4. Specific technical / role interview (sometimes prior to the personal interview)
  5. Interview with HR

After you have completed the first four rounds, the HR round will appear. As an applicant you will present yourself here briefly, respond to some questions and answers from HR interviews about your work position or your profession and finally, address your pay, benefits, allowances, deductions, company rules, requirements, etc.

Nervousness is perfectly natural, so how can you ensure that your responses are clever and lead to selection? To assist you we have compiled some of the most popular questions and responses (in many versions). HR round questions.

Go extensively through this blog to read and answer HR questions.

Note: Please make sure you speak where possible about the correct skills and certifications

This is one of the most common questions in an HR interview. Your reply must be brief, crisp and timely. Some high-impact solutions are available to help you make a major difference.

Here are a few potential responses to high impact to make you feel better.

Example #1.

Thank you for this chance, sir/ma’am. I’m from XYZ City and part of a nuclear family. My father is an employee of the central government and my mother is a vice-principal in a private school. My younger sister is expected to appear this year on her 10th board of CBSE. We are a family which is very close-knit. I consider myself as a person who is optimistic, attentive, and hardworking. Without hesitation, I carry out any mission assigned to me, given that the directions are clear. I never hesitate to answer my questions in case of doubts. I’ve always been a fast learner and I love to keep my learning process going and figure out new ways to solve problems. In fact, I like to compete with my own past results rather than compete with my peers, as I agree that progress is always better than perfection!

Do not make the mistake of sharing too much personal information in any of your questions and answers round HR interviews. There’s not enough time left for you to sell your expertise and related professional skills.

Example #2.

Well, I am a self-confident, hardworking and very professional guy. I have always carried out without hesitation all the tasks assigned to me, ensuring that the orders from my Reporting Managers or Seniors were valid. I was a good mentor for my juniors too, and never hesitate to guide them. On the other hand, I am a creative person and I enjoy pushing my boundaries. I keep pushing myself out of the box to think for that!

This is another version of questions and answers frequently asked by HR Interview, for the same question.

Example #3.

, First of all, I want to thank you for giving me this wonderful opportunity to introduce myself to you. I am Vellore Neena. I completed my BCA with 86 percent at MMES Arts and Science College and finished +2 at 84 percent at EVRN High School, finishing my 10th at 74 percent at the same school. Coming to my family. We’ve got 4 members that include me. My dad is an employee, and my mother is a home-builder. I’ve got one older brother. He’s a Wipro software engineer, that’s all about my family. My strength is that I can handle any kind of situation, quick learner. All is about me.

You will certainly be facing this question in an HR round among all other HR interview questions and answers that you have been asked, and I am sure you will treat it as the easiest of all questions. Okay, that is not so! If you feel comfortable, never underestimate the likelihood of scoring better points with a crisp reply. It can become a fate-changer for applicants with less than 5 years of total employment experience.

If your degree is obviously related to the job for which you are interviewing, you can provide that answer.

Example #1.

I’m a B. Tech in Economics, Computer Science / B. Com. I do have an MBA, or an ABC Academy Digital Marketing Certification exam. What more do you want to know?

If your degree is not as important as it was meant to be, but you believe you have the ability to shine through, you may give this response. This is a useful tip for questions and answers regarding HR interviews.

Example #2.

I have worked with 2 other Soft Skills students on an independent project work. I also took part in several paper presentations about Business Communication.

Do not forget to talk about your big topic in your University UG / PG and also about topics/papers that are important to the job you have requested

Example #3.

During my first semester, I earned an A during English Academic and Technical Written Communication. Here’s my scoreboard.

You’ll find a new HR interview question here, and the answer to that question will be more important for your career. If there is an unusual pause, start talking about co-curricular activities you are good at. You could say this, for example.

Example #4.

I am a music lover, and a guitarist at the beginner stage. I love jamming with my 4-member band at my place every weekend.

This is a very common question put to candidates by HR personnel. Know interviewees are hardly ever impressed by flowery responses these days. So be careful as you tackle this one.

Example #1.

I am cautious, dedicated, trustworthy and self-motivated with many strengths, specifically. I’ve ever come across the greatest dreamer! I easily forgive and hate to hold my heart to rebellion. My greatest weakness is that when I’m serious, I don’t like to be interrupted. One of my weaknesses is that I very easily trust people. I am a very patient, and I’m working actively on this lacuna, as I said earlier.

Example #2.

That’s why I’m a fast learner, I’m impatient. But honestly, I believe it is a real weakness to be impatient. I expect my team members to prove themselves and begin the first mission. I tend to stop delegating work and collecting projects alone, should a particular resource fail. I work on it and my colleagues helped me to a great extent in my previous organizations. I prepare my people for my exact expectations in order to compensate for my own weakness. I give you then a full scope of the task and several checkpoint dates, when you will be able to update me on your progress, using a demo/presentation if necessary. My former work as a Project Manager included 15 individual contributors and company managers, such as attorneys, web designers, graphic designers, SEO / SEM consultants, editors, authors, and callers. I used to break the whole task into manageable chunks for each employee, and then have strict times to go back to me. This process has worked brilliantly, helped me to stay within the budget allocated and helped all achieve their individual objectives.

Example #1.

I usually complete my work in a given time. But if any work is needed and I’m applying for that work then I’ll certainly be present at nights and weekends, without any problem.

Example #2.

Sir, I don’t care about the moment, I don’t care about my job during the night or day. Sir, I ‘m going to be there if my work is incomplete or my company requires my presence at night or weekend!

Example #3.

If my job is still pending then I certainly have no trouble working on weekends. If the company provides full nighttime security for girls then nighttime work isn’t a problem.

Don’t slip into a trap for the interviewer. You get shot at this question to test your level of trust. So don’t feel unarmed or have a surprise look. Keep your peace and smartly reply with a clear and indestructible logic.

Example #1.

I had the need to start working in the real world, as soon as I graduated. Not that I am a total beginner. I’ve been through 3 internships, 2 of which are paid by respectable organizations. The certification helped me to secure an offer from one of those firms. I sometimes ask myself if I should have completed my postgraduate degree first. I would not have been able to grow my entire portfolio had I done so. And I hope that my track record will help me to be selected in your esteemed organization, for this position.

Example #2.

It ‘s important to have a PG degree but I don’t think it’s mandatory. Most job seekers do have similar degrees out there. A PG degree from a reputed university along with the whole experience will certainly help me stand out in order to distinguish. I ‘m aware of this because as soon as I get a call from some university about a weekend-class executive course, I’m sure I’m going to apply for the same. I have a lot of responsibilities back home so I don’t think it will be wise on my part to enroll in a full-time PG programme.

Example #1.

Having no job’ is the most boring job. If, on the other hand, we have a job but we are not interested in that work, it would be a boredom for us.

Example #2.

According to me, it all depends on us to feel bored and happy, nothing is boring in this life all comes with new ideas so we need to enjoy it and learn from it.

Example #3.

You can’t say boring work / job. Because they are still learning reach, enhancing process improvement that will take less time to complete and 100% successful completion of existing work and looking for new fields where you can experience yourself and enhance your current skills.

This question is addressed specifically to seasoned workers who have more than twice switched jobs in their entire career. Freshers are permitted to skip to the next question.

Example #1.

You might label me a ‘frequent career-changer’ but I really feel like I’m a far better employee today. My switches helped me to develop better interpersonal skills, acquire diverse skills, and adapt to changing business environments. Because I’ve learned to deal with complexity and confusion, I can solve issues more easily and creatively. My first job has helped me develop confidence. My second job has helped me to master numbers and spreadsheets. My third job helped me to develop better skills for people and to adapt in the midst of culturally diverse and geographically dispersed teams. All in all, I feel my diverse experience makes me today an ideal candidate for this job position.

Example #2.

During those couple of years I never intended to work with so many businesses. The companies for which I worked were small and one of them was going through a very bad time. But honestly, it was a rewarding journey for me. I will now go into a new situation with confidence and work out how to make a difference effectively. It was always supposed to happen and I wouldn’t be trading for something all the experience I gained from my changes! But I look forward to not having to do this in the near future anymore. I want to make a stint with a reputed organization, like yours, that lasts for 5 to 10 years. That will, in the long run, make my career a stable and fruitful one.

Don’t simply talk about your strengths, your interviewer really wants to know about your strengths.

Example #1.

I am passionate about my job and a good listener too, meaning I take my orders seriously. I’m not a person leaving things at midway. I never lose concentration, even though I find myself under stress or have to follow strict deadlines. I like to complete every single task on my to-do list. Optimism, energy, and my ability to learn fast let me hit the ground and solve problems quickly. I do have excellent communication skills, which means that in the future I will be able to communicate relatively well with my company clients and my internal team members. Based on my abilities, skills, and experience, I know I ‘d be a great addition to the team.

Example #2.

I have the skills required to make that risk worthwhile. It’s my motto to chat less, and let my work talk. Every job was assigned to me in the past was completed on schedule and in line with all the quality expectations.

Example #3.

I was told I am a really good manager. My team tells me I ‘m giving them a lot of flexibility in the way they do their job, which they really like. They also say I’m really enthusiastic, so when we’re faced with too much work they ‘re telling me my way really helps keep them motivated and quiet. My boss also tells me I’m very innovative in finding new ways of working that will cut down on inefficiency.

Don’t simply talk about your strengths, your interviewer really wants to know about your strengths.

Example #1.

I don’t mind his age. I admire his skill, talents and creativity and I do not hesitate to learn from him. My work is very important and to that designation I report.

Example #2.

Sir, I have no problem working under a younger person because I have no ego on top of my head to push me down instead of putting that ego under my feet to push me up.

Don’t just think about your shortcomings, the interviewer really wants you to think about the flaws! Try resisting the urge to give him / her more rejection points. Answer diplomatically.

Example #1.

You may think my inexperience is my weakness because I have never worked in my life and this is only my first job. But I’m begging to differ. I’m a quick learner and a very open-minded person. I’m assuming that I don’t have any preconceived notions about how I feel I should be doing my job.

Example #2.

Often I work too hard, and take too much care of my job. I take home my tasks, and I work even on weekends. You can call me a workaholic, but my family never fails to point out that this is wrong. I realize slowly and steadily that speed and smart working are key. So, I started reaching out to my colleagues for ready-to-use workarounds, so I could give my family more time.

Example #1.

I joined my previous organization as a fresher and after spending my two months there I begin to work in my own way that I learned during my training period, but my senior didn’t like this he started to criticize me for at least one week that he always refused my work that I was doing. After this he stops criticizing me for appreciating me when I get one project through these efforts. Through this, I learned my greatest professional experience that we can overcome with critique.

Example #2.

I ‘d like to replace the word Coached criticizes. There are mistakes we all make at work and in my past employment, I was fortunate to have been taught by my bosses. To give you an example, I was asked to make a presentation as a training material for the whole team and the presentation did not please my bosses so I asked them to help me make a better presentation and it turned out to be one of the best presentations.

Freshers with no internship experience may move on to the next question to prepare questions and answers for HR interviews.

Example #1.

I used to get nervous when I was speaking before large audiences. You can tell I was scenario-fearing, and I think I still do. This is partly because I am naturally shy. No wonder I’ve always been assigned Individual Contributor roles. My current boss may claim this as one of my shortcomings, and in fact, he has helped me overcome my shyness. Thanks to him, I am an active member of Toastmasters International today and so far my trip with them has been great! I work to improve my public speaking skills and leadership skills, and I’m sure that my future employer will see a sharp change in me.

Example #2.

Interestingly enough. My boss did not list any areas for improvement during my last performance review, and gave me an outstanding rating. If I had to think of one, though, I ‘d say I ‘d need to speak up more during meetings. I still have interesting ideas and my thoughts relate to my current project. Yet I speak to my boss about those suggestions and let him do all the conversation during meetings. During brainstorming sessions I will focus on speaking up more.

Example #1.

I was in College’s final year in 2019. I’ve done three things in that time to improve my knowledge. 1. I enrolled myself in the Sun Certified Java Programmer course in Aptech. I’ll be turning up on my exam early. 2. I purchased subscriptions to a magazine such as Dataquest. These magazines help me keep up to date on new topics in the IT world. 3. I’ve completed my final year Java-based application project. The topic was Centralized Remote Based Information Scheme at College.

Example #2.

Being a Windows / Linux Administrator at L3 or senior level, I mastered my experience of virtualization on VMware, KVM, Xen, Hyper-V etc. Last year I made sure I had a better understanding of storage and networking. Last month I picked up PERL scripting, and planned to pick up Ruby and Python in the next three months. I’m also a programmer at the beginner level as I learned C++. I mastered Chef on work and deployed Amazon AWS to better grasp the cloud. I have also been awarded a Red Hat Certified Engineer (RHCE) license and I will target RHCA by the end of 2019.

Example #1.

Yes I do. Me and my friends worked together during my summer internship at Cadence. Ours was a mixed group with a variety of skills and we produced results that would have been impossible to individually produce. I still had to keep all my contact channels open to ensure the project stayed on track. I was responsible for my part of the code and for the collective execution of the whole project. I have been working closely with senior key team members to keep my outcomes on track. In the end , I was able to deliver within budget and on time.

Example #2.

Yes, I do. Although I am in an IC (individual contributor) position at the moment, I like to work with others as personally I am social and outgoing. I like nurturing and building team spirit. We go for a team lunch or hold team events at least once a month and usually, I’m in charge of the pool fund’s fiancés. I guarantee a potluck lunch in case there is no budget left in some months. Being a senior in the team, I keep my eyes and ears open to understand everybody else’s needs, particularly my juniors and freshers. Instead of getting bogged down with irrelevant pressure, we help each other focus on what really matters.

Example #1.

My ideal workplace or organization is a fair one that even as a fresher respects my efforts and encourages me to speak up and share my ideas. It’s a place where I can be myself while working towards a bigger objective.

Example #2.

My dream business is the one that can pose exciting challenges. Such opportunities will bring the best to me because I can draw on my interests and experiences. I like my current workplace as it offers all of this together with a clean , professional working atmosphere, and more. But I look forward to a firm that is actively involved in social welfare, and that is exactly what your organization is doing.

This question does not apply to the first-time job seekers who are about to face a round of questions and answers from HR interviews. If you’re fresher you can skip to the next question. This question is often posed to supervisors and above-level interview applicants.

Example #1.

Yeah, I feel terrible and trust me. But when I’m working I know how to keep feelings at bay. Firing enters with me at the very end of the lane. When I set up a team, I do that very carefully after considering every single team member ‘s past feedback and history. But you can’t always pick your squad. Sometimes, you have to work with a few rotten potatoes, and removing them from the basket is essential to save the rest. Within two to three months, I have a tendency to spot poor performers or join a new team. I consulted my peers and other team members lately when I spotted one. Then, I had to set up a one-on-one meeting with the guy and gave him several written and verbal warnings over a period of 30 days. I helped him prepare a list of work and behavioral goals I chose after consulting with the rest of the team. I had to fire that person eventually because he showed zero signs of improvement, drive, and motivation. That firing was for a reason and I left no other option in my rule book

This question does not apply to the first-time job seekers who are about to face a round of questions and answers from HR interviews. If you’re fresher you can skip to the next question. This question is often posed to supervisors and above-level interview applicants.

Example #1.

I have never been a great public speaker. The very thought of facing a crowd used to make me nervous. When I started college, my best friend advised me that I had to get over this roadblock to shine through. So, last year, I took the bold step of trying my hand at public speaking. I joined the Debate Club at my college. Since then, I have participated in multiple contests. Initially, I stammered, forgot my lines, dropped the microphone once due to my sweaty palms, and even got booed at or scolded by the judges. Yet, I kept on participating. Last month, for the very first time in a year, I won the third prize. It was a great boost to my self-confidence. I believe that it is my greatest feat so far, even bigger than my AIEEE rank.

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